It’s late March and I haven’t posted a blog here since mid December! WHAT? How can this be? Its been a long winter with a handful of events and drama that has kept me occupied, and away from the carving shed. Christmas, New Year viruses, mid January snow storms, a family loss, caretaking my husband and now COVID19 . Happily I can say by the end of February I got back to into my carving shed to complete some overdue Christmas presents for my nieces Sophie and Callie, who live away. They loved getting presents 2.5 months later! They tell me that mail, special express, a parcel to find months later in your mail box is indeed a treat. Try it!

It’s been a late winter of making small items for commissions and gifts to sell in local shops if they are still open during the pandemic. On my carving bench, I have some wonderful handcrafted signs to carve for two dear friends’ new house… and a handful of unfinished wooden bowls and platters waiting for me patiently to finish them since early December.

Who can anticipate these kind of interruptions? I have learnt over the years to accept them, knowing that time and opportunities will present themselves for me to be in the carving shed soon to smell the wonderful scent of fresh cut wood, the feel of sawdust in my shoes, dust in the respirator, finding your favourite work gloves, picking up the rough cut power tools to sculpt and carve my seasoned, native woods. Spring has arrived and so have some new commissions – bowls, platters, more charcuteries, more spoons and funky requests for owls, fish and 3 dimensional pieces. We are now into our 2nd week of the corona virus self isolation and social distancing which has really helped me to be at home, and spend time down at the carving shed , focusing on carving.

 

 

In the meantime, I share with you some of the charcuterie boards I made up for a professor at Royal Roads University recently – gifts for her students, in addition to the many spoons handcrafted for Barking Dog Studio here in Sooke. The spoons were oiled today and as I laid them out on a kitchen table, it looked like I had created a special spoon ladder and a spoon picket fence. For my customers, I make funky spoons – they are not perfect, but this is what they seem to like: character and personality! There are spoons that are to be used as sticks to stir one’s coffee in a French press coffee pot; strong arbutus lifters for the stir fry pan… to flip eggs, pancakes or turkey hamburgers with different sizes of arbutus and yellow cedar. Stir your home-made soups. I have maple, yellow cedar, arbutus and yew spoons for salads.